TECHNICAL RESCUE PROGRAMS

Fire / Technical Rescue Programs

The Bowling Green Fire Department provides technical rescue for the city of Bowling Green as well as Warren County and Surrounding Counties. The program consists of 6 disciplines. Rope Rescue, Confined Space Rescue, Trench Collapse Rescue, Structural Collapse Rescue, Swift Water Rescue, and Machinery/Vehicle Extrication. Along with the 100’s of hours of standard firefighter training that is required at BGFD, this team of individuals must also obtain and maintain training in these specialized programs.

fire dept bowling green ky

Rope Rescue

Rope rescue is the core of basically all other technical rescue programs at BGFD. BGFD rope rescue program is designed to be capable of responding effectively to low and high angle rope rescue incidents in both the outdoors and the industrial setting. Our crews are trained to the NFPA standard for Operations Level responses with some members also certified as Rope Rescue Technicians. We currently have 4 apparatus with full compliments of rope rescue equipment including our rescue engine and our 3 aerial apparatus. Our technical rescue team responds to the City of Bowling Green, Warren county and surrounding areas if requested.

rope rescue
confined space training

Confined Space Rescue

A confined space has limited or restricted means of entry and exit and is not designed for continuous occupancy. Confined spaces include but are not limited to tanks, vessels, silos, storage bins, manholes, etc.

The Bowling Green Fire Department contains a technical rescue team consisting of multiple members trained at a minimum to the level of Confined Space Rescue Operations. Many members also possess certifications to the level of Confined Space Rescue Technician. Based out of Station 1, the BGFD possesses and maintains training on several pieces of equipment specific to confined space rescue including mobile closed circuit air carts, confined space harnesses and other PPE, durahoist and other technical tri-pods, ventilation equipment, and air quality monitoring equipment. The BGFD exceeds requirements in Confined Space Rescue set forth by NFPA 1006, OSHA, and 29 CFR 1610.146.

Trench Collapse Rescue

A trench is defined as a man-made, cut, cavity or depression in the Earth’s surface that is deeper than it is wide.

The department identified the need for a Trench Rescue Program in the late 1990’s. Around 2000 there was a Technician 1 class that was provided by an outside instructor from Virginia that was hosted by BGFD. 2004 the purchase of the Trench Rescue / Confined Space Trailer began and was outfitted. It was located at Station Three and pulled by the old two man rescue truck. Dan Brown spearheaded the purchase and Dustin Rockrohr was in charge of outfitting it with equipment and the interior build of the shelving etc. Dan Brown and Gary Preston built our panels sometime prior to that, most likely for the class the department hosted. Around 2007 the Trench program was moved to Station Five when the Haz Mat Program was transferred to Station Three. This lasted until 2010 when Station Six was built and that rescue truck was put in service and at that time the Trench/Confined Space program was moved to Station Six. The CC’s at the time the program was developed included ED Moss, Bob Sanborn, Roy Sims, Burt Stinson, Dan Brown, Gary Preston, and Keith Mefford, but many others were involved. Ed Moss was coordinator from 2004-2010. Brian O’Callaghan from 2010-2011. Matt Jones 2011-2012. Bret Smith 2012-2017. In 2017 the Tech Rescue Program was moved to Station #1 bringing the Trench trailer and other specialties where it is currently located.

trench training
structure collapse

Structural Collapse Rescue

Structural Collapse can result from many possible events including tornados, earthquakes, vehicle collisions, or terrorist attacks, to name a few.

The Bowling Green Fire Department contains a technical rescue team consisting of multiple members trained at a minimum to the level of Structural Collapse Rescue Operations. Many members also possess certification to the level of Structural Collapse Rescue Technician. Based out of Station 1, the BGFD possesses and maintains training on several pieces of equipment specific to structural collapse rescue including concrete cutting saws, core drills, industrial jack hammers, and oxy-propane torches.

Swift Water Rescue

With many rivers in Warren County and with Drakes Creek and Barren River in the city of Bowling Green, BGFD must always be on the ready for swift water rescues.

The Bowling Green Fire Department contains a technical rescue team consisting of multiple members trained at a minimum to the level of Swift Water Rescue Operations. Many members also possess certification to the level of Swift Water Rescue Technician. Based out of Stations 1, 5, and 6, the BGFD possesses and maintains training on several pieces of equipment specific to swift water rescue. Motorized rescue boats as well as rafts are located at all of these stations. The BGFD technical rescue team maintains training on swift water boat operations, swimming in swift water, combative swimmer rescue, ferry angles, rescue throw rope bags, and rope vectoring, to name a few.

swift water rescue
vehicle rescue

Vehicle and Machinery Extrication

With several busy thoroughfares through Bowling Green as well as many factories that contain dangerous machinery, BGFD must be prepared for many possible machinery and vehicle extrications.

All firefighters within the Bowling Green Fire Department are trained extensively in vehicle extrication. All sub-station engines carry a minimum level of extrication equipment to help them provide service to the outlying areas of the city. Station 1 is where Rescue 1 is stationed. Station 1 is the main station for all technical rescue including extrication. Rescue 1 is a large engine that has more compartment space than the normal engines in Bowling Green. Rescue 1 carries a few more extrication tools and more vehicle stabilization, lifting, and moving equipment.

Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARRF)

With Bowling Green containing the Bowling Green – Warren County Regional Airport, all BGFD suppression personnel are trained and prepared for Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting with Station 2 (aka The Airport Station) staffed with the most highly trained firefighters in ARFF.

The Bowling Green – Warren County Regional Airport was established in 1934 as a military airfield. The Airport sits on approximately 525 acres with two runways. The airport averages 171 aircraft per day ranging from general aviation to military aircraft.

fire dept bowling green ky
fire dept bowling green ky

Hazardous Materials Response

With many busy thoroughfares in the city of Bowling Green, including Interstate 65 and Interstate 165 as well as several busy train tracks there is an unfathomable amount of dangerous materials being transported through our city at any given time not to mention the many businesses and factories that use or create dangerous materials in their production processes. BGFD personnel are prepared for these hazards.

The HazMat program is expected to have the ability to adequately mitigate anything from a leak on a tractor trailer to stopping a Chlorine leak on a rail road tanker.  Other topics that HazMat teams are expected to have knowledge on are weapons of mass destruction, radiation incidents, fixed facility leaks, proper identification of substances, proper decontamination of victims/responders and proper documentation.  The field of hazardous materials is always changing and this constant change keeps the topic interesting and exciting!

Honor Guard

The purpose of the BGFD Honor Guard is to have a specially trained group of Bowling Green firefighters that can perform honorary funeral functions for retirees who passed away and whose common goal is to honor the Flag, the Fallen and their families.

The BGFD Honor Guard constantly strives to maintain the highest level of discipline, appearance and training. It is our mission to honor and remember those who have gone before us. Like honor guards in other communities and around the world, our dedication to pay tribute to our fallen brothers and sisters, whatever the capacity, is foremost in our minds. After all, the BEST we can do is the LEAST we can do.

honor guard